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Watermelons: The Green Movement’s True Colors | James Delingpole – the Conservative Top 10

Watermelons: The Green Movement’s True Colors | James Delingpole

5.0 out of 5 stars A critically important book August 12, 2011
By Geoff Puterbaugh
Format:Paperback|Amazon Verified Purchase
James Delingpole, a popular conservative writer in the UK, has written one of the most important books of our time. I surmise that he was always something of an AGW skeptic, but when Climategate came around, he selflessly abandoned himself to the cause of rooting out AGW and its hacks.

AGW = “Anthropogenic Global Warming.” Don’t be intimidated. It just means “Man-Made Global Warming,” which could be abbreviated as MMGW. And it’s a crock, folks. It’s an absolute crock. It has been defended and promoted by a group of seedy men, including a large crowd at the UN — and, if you haven’t noticed that the UN has been trying to get a lot bigger than its britches, transforming itself from a forum for discussion into a Global Legislator (a la EU), then I don’t think you’re very observant. AGW was a big push by the UN bureaucrats (and their wannabes) to put the UN on top of the world, dictating to the lowly peasants what they should and should not do — all of this without being elected, just like the (ho ho) “President of Europe.”

Where do we go to vote these creeps out of office? Nowhere! Welcome to 21st century democracy, “a la Europe.”

As for AGW (or MMGW), that continues to be one of the most embarrassing theories ever put forward by scientists. There is no evidence at all to support it, although bloviating politicians such as Al Gore think it’s the gospel truth (and are expecting to make billions once they have suckered you and me into believing them). The main idea is “carbon credits,” by which companies which actually make stuff have to buy “carbon credits” from people who don’t do anything but gaze at the South American jungles. It’s a really crazy-weird attempt to make megabucks off the fact that humans breathe in oxygen and breathe out carbon dioxide, while plants breathe in carbon dioxide and breathe out oxygen. Therefore, MORE carbon dioxide makes for MORE plants and jungles, which make MORE oxygen for us and other animals.

The tiny helpless “environmental” group known as the World Wildlife Foundation recently tried to scoop up SIXTY BILLION DOLLARS from its claims on Brazilian jungles. When you see figures like 60 billion, you should be aware that WWF and Greenpeace are not “helpless tiny” movements. They are competing in the same space as Big Oil and all their “enemies,” and they need to be called out as “Big Green” and asked just what they are doing for the cause of conservation.

James Delingpole deserves many literary prizes for detailing all of the crimes committed by the AGW folks: suppressing evidence they don’t like, assassinating the reputations of scientists they don’t like, censoring the “scientific literature” — really, the list goes on and on, and…

YOU NEED TO READ THIS BOOK!

“Nazi Germany took a stronger approach to pushing eco-ideology. It was the first nation to ban smoking on public transport (Hitler thought it a filthy habit: tobacco, he believed, was “the wrath of the Red Man against the White man, vengeance for having been given hard liquor”). It was also the first to take the concept of “animal rights” seriously (in 1933 Goering–ah, the big cuddly softie–said that anyone found guilty of animal cruelty or experimentation would be sent to the concentration camps).”

“Our teeming population is the strongest evidence our numbers are burdensome to the world, which can hardly support us from its natural elements. Our wants grow more and more keen and our complaints more bitter in all mouths, while nature fails in affording us our usual sustenance. In every deed, pestilence and famine and wars have to be regarded as a remedy for nations as the means of pruning the luxuriance of the human race.”

No, not Paul Ehrlich 1968. Nor the Prince of Wales 2010. This was the utterance of Carthaginian priest Tertullian in his “Treatise of the Soul” in 210 AD, when the world’s population was a mere 250 million. Since then it has grown to over 6.5 billion. Frankly, which planet would you rather inhabit? Tertullian’s blissfully uncrowded car-free zone? Or our current congested hell of long life-expectancies, modern dental care, paid holidays, iPods, contraception, literacy and penicillin?”

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